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Sunbeam - 3-Litre series

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About Sunbeam

Sunbeam was a marque registered by John Marston Co. Ltd of Wolverhampton, England, in 1888. The company first made bicycles, then motorcycles and cars from the late 19th century to circa 1936, and applied the marque to all three forms of transportation. A Sunbeam was the first British car to win a Grand Prix race, and set a number of land speed records.

Early history

John Marston was apprenticed to the Jeddo Works of Wolverhampton as a japanner (metal lacquerer). In 1859, at the age of 23, he bought two existing tinplate manufacturers and set up on his own, John Marston Co. Ltd. Marston was an avid bicycler, and in 1877 set up the Sunbeamland Cycle Factory, producing bikes known as Sunbeams. Between 1899 and 1901 the company also produced a number of experimental cars, but none of these were offered to the market.

The first production car named as a Sunbeam was introduced in 1901, after a partnership with Maxwell Maberly-Smith. The Sunbeam-Mabley design was an odd one, with seats on either side of a belt-drive powered by a single-cylinder engine of less than 3hp. The design was a limited success, with 420 sold at £130 when production ended in 1904. At that point the company started production of a Thomas Pullinger designed car based on the Berliet mechanicals. They introduced a new model, based on a Peugeot motor they bought for study, in 1906 and sold about ten a week.

In 1905, the Sunbeam Motorcar Company Ltd was formed separate from the rest of the John Marston business which retained the Sunbeam motorcycles and bicycles.

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4-door
5-seat
S6 12v 2.9L DOHC M-4
100.7 kW / 135.0 hp / 135.0 hp        
   

Sunbeam 3 Litre S/Charged (1929)

4-door 5-seater touring car (tourer), 6-cylinder 12-valve straight (inline) engine, DOHC (double overhead camshafts, twin cam), 2916 cm3 / 177.9 cu in / 177.9 cu in, 100.7 kW / 135.0 hp / 135.0 hp, manual 4-speed transmission, rear wheel drive

Infobox

Auto Insurance

Defined as: The contract by which the insurer assumes the risk of any loss the owner or operator of a car may incur through damage to property or persons as the result of an accident. There are many specific forms of automobile insurance, varying not only in the kinds of risk that they cover but also in the legal principles underlying them.

In “plain” English, this means coverage that is carried by someone who is driving a motor vehicle that is involved in an accident that causes property damage or personal injury to someone.

Currently, New Hampshire and Wisconsin do not have “compulsory auto insurance liability laws”. Simply put, this means that these states do not require licensed drivers (and there should not be any other kind of driver) to have some type of auto insurance policy that provides at least minimum coverage. The remaining 48 states do have such insurance laws in effect.

You should check with the state you live in if you have questions concerning whether or not you are required to have auto insurance, and also to determine if you are required to have a certain amount of coverage. If you are required to have a certain amount, you will then need to check to see if there is a minimum amount and maximum amount.

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