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Messerschmitt - all models

Series: TG, Tiger

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About Messerschmitt

Messerschmitt AG, later Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm (MBB) was a famous German aircraft manufacturer, known primarily for its World War II fighter aircraft, notably the Bf 109 and Me 262. The company survived in the post-war era, undergoing a number of mergers and changing its name from Messerschmitt before being bought by DASA in 1989, now part of EADS.

Background

The government authorities were instrumental in setting up Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG (BFW) from the unprofitable Otto-Flugzeugwerke In February 1916, the south German engineering company MAN AG and several banks purchased the aircraft builder Otto-Flugzeugwerke. On this company’s premises the investors established a new business, Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG. The articles of association were drawn up on February 19 and 20, and completed on March 2, 1916. Details of the company were recorded in the Commercial Register with an equity capital of RM 1,000,000 on March 7, 1916. 36% of the capital was provided by the Bank für Handel und Industrie, Berlin, 30% by MAN AG and 34% by Hermann Bachstein, Berlin. The first Chairman of the Board of Management was Peter Eberwein, who had previously been employed at Albatros Flugzeugwerke.

Due to the need of immediate aircraft production, there was no time for development work, so BFW manufactured aircraft under license from the Albatros Flugzeugwerke of Berlin. This meant that within a month of being set up, the company was able to supply aircraft to the war ministries of Prussia and Bavaria. However, major quality problems were encountered at the start. The German air crews frequently complained about the serious defects that appeared in the first machines from BFW. The same thing had happened with the aircraft from the predecessor company run by Gustav Otto. The reason for these deficiencies was a lack of precision in production. The majority of the workforce had been taken over by BFW from Otto Flugzeugwerke. It was only organizational changes and more intensive supervision of the assembly line that succeeded in resolving these problems by the end of 1916. This done, BFW was able, in the months that followed, to turn out over 200 aircraft per month with a workforce of around 3,000, and rose to become the largest aircraft manufacturer in Bavaria.

The end of the war hit BFW hard, since military demand for aircraft collapsed. The company’s management were thus forced to look for new products with which to maintain their position in the market. Since WWI aircraft were largely built from wood to keep their weight down, BFW was equipped with the very latest joinery plant. What is more, the company still held stocks of materials sufficient for about 200 aircraft, and worth 4.7 million reichsmarks. It therefore seemed a good idea to use both the machinery and the materials for the production of furniture and fitted kitchens. In addition, from 1921 onwards, the company manufactured motorcycles of its own design under the names of Flink and Helios.

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2-seat
S2   0.5L TS M-4
17.9 kW / 24.0 hp / 24.0 hp  33.0 N·m / 24.3 lb·ft / 24.3 lb·ft
   

Messerschmitt TG 500 (1959)

2-seater minicar, petrol (gasoline) 2-cylinder 0-valve straight (inline) engine, two stroke, 490 cm3 / 29.9 cu in / 29.9 cu in, 17.9 kW / 24.0 hp / 24.0 hp @ 5000 rpm / 5000 rpm / 5000 rpm, 33.0 N·m / 24.3 lb·ft / 24.3 lb·ft @ 4000 rpm / 4000 rpm / 4000 rpm, manual 4-speed transmission, rear wheel drive

  
2-seat
S2   0.4L TS M-4
14.5 kW / 19.4 hp / 19.4 hp        
   

Messerschmitt Tiger (1960)

2-seater fixed-head coupé, petrol (gasoline) 2-cylinder 0-valve straight (inline) engine, two stroke, 400 cm3 / 24.4 cu in / 24.4 cu in, 14.5 kW / 19.4 hp / 19.4 hp, manual 4-speed transmission, rear wheel drive

Infobox

Beyond basic auto insurance

In addition to having enough liability protection, there are some other coverages you should consider:

Collision: Pays for damage to your car resulting from a collision with another car, an object or as a result of flipping over. It also covers damage caused by potholes. Even if you are at fault for the accident, your collision coverage will reimburse you for the costs of repairing your car, minus the deductible. If you are not at fault, your insurance company may try to recover the amount they paid out from the other driver’s insurance company though a process called subrogation. If the company is successful, you will be reimbursed for the deductible.

Comprehensive: Reimburses you for loss due to theft or damage caused by something other than a collision with another car or object, such as fire, falling objects, missiles, explosion, earthquake, windstorm, hail, flood, vandalism, riot, or contact with animals such as birds or deer. Comprehensive insurance will also reimburse you if your windshield is cracked or shattered; some companies may waive the deductible on the glass portion of this coverage.

Uninsured and Underinsured Motorist Coverage: Reimburses you, a member of your family, or a designated driver if one of you is hit by an uninsured or hit-and-run driver. Underinsured motorist coverage comes into play when an at-fault driver has insufficient insurance to pay for your total loss. These coverages are required in 19 states, but available in all. It is important to purchase the same amount of coverage for uninsured/underinsured motorists as you have for liability to others.

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