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Jeep - CJ series

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About Jeep

Jeep is an automobile marque (and registered trademark) of Chrysler. It is the oldest Sports utility vehicle (SUV) brand, with Land Rover coming in a close second.

Many people treat the word "jeep" as a generic term and use it uncapitalised for any vehicle of this shape and function: see genericised trademark.

History

The origin of the term "jeep"

There are many stories about where the word "jeep" came from. Although they make for interesting and memorable tales, they are difficult to verify.

Probably the most popular notion has it that the vehicle bore the designation "GP" (for "General Purpose"), which was phonetically slurred into the word jeep. R. Lee Ermey, on his television series Mail Call, disputes this, saying that the vehicle was designed for specific duties, was never referred to as "General Purpose", and that the name may have been derived from Ford's nomenclature referring to the vehicle as GP (G for government-use, and P to designate its 80-inch wheelbase). "General purpose" does appear in connection with the vehicle in the WW2 TM 9-803 manual, which describes the vehicle as "... a general purpose, personnel, or cargo carrier especially adaptable for reconnaissance or command, and designated as ¼-ton 4x4 truck", and the vehicle is designated a "GP" in TM 9-2800, Standard Military Motor Vehicles, September 1, 1949, but whether the average jeep-driving GI would have been familiar with either of these manuals is open to debate.

This version of the story may be confused with the nickname of another series of vehicles with the GP designation. The Electro-Motive Division of General Motors, a maker of railroad locomotives, introduced its "General Purpose" line in 1949, using the GP tag. These locomotives are commonly referred to as Geeps, pronounced the same way as "Jeep".

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2-seat
S6 12v 4.2L OHV M-3
73.1 kW / 98.0 hp / 98.0 hp  261.0 N·m / 192.5 lb·ft / 192.5 lb·ft
   

Jeep CJ-5 (1979)

2-seater offroad vehicle, petrol (gasoline) 6-cylinder 12-valve straight (inline) engine, OHV (overhead valve, I-head), 4235 cm3 / 258.4 cu in / 258.4 cu in, 73.1 kW / 98.0 hp / 98.0 hp @ 3200 rpm / 3200 rpm / 3200 rpm, 261.0 N·m / 192.5 lb·ft / 192.5 lb·ft @ 1600 rpm / 1600 rpm / 1600 rpm, manual 3-speed transmission, four wheel drive

  
2-seat
V8 16v 5.0L OHV M-3
94.0 kW / 126.1 hp / 126.1 hp  296.0 N·m / 218.3 lb·ft / 218.3 lb·ft
   

Jeep CJ-5 (1979)

2-seater offroad vehicle, petrol (gasoline) 8-cylinder 16-valve V engine, OHV (overhead valve, I-head), 4982 cm3 / 304.0 cu in / 304.0 cu in, 94.0 kW / 126.1 hp / 126.1 hp @ 3600 rpm / 3600 rpm / 3600 rpm, 296.0 N·m / 218.3 lb·ft / 218.3 lb·ft @ 2000 rpm / 2000 rpm / 2000 rpm, manual 3-speed transmission, four wheel drive

  
2-seat
V8 16v 5.0L OHV M-3
94.0 kW / 126.1 hp / 126.1 hp  296.0 N·m / 218.3 lb·ft / 218.3 lb·ft
   

Jeep CJ-7 (1979)

2-seater offroad vehicle, petrol (gasoline) 8-cylinder 16-valve V engine, OHV (overhead valve, I-head), 4982 cm3 / 304.0 cu in / 304.0 cu in, 94.0 kW / 126.1 hp / 126.1 hp @ 3600 rpm / 3600 rpm / 3600 rpm, 296.0 N·m / 218.3 lb·ft / 218.3 lb·ft @ 2000 rpm / 2000 rpm / 2000 rpm, manual 3-speed transmission, four wheel drive

  
2-seat
S6 12v 4.2L OHV M-3
73.1 kW / 98.0 hp / 98.0 hp  261.0 N·m / 192.5 lb·ft / 192.5 lb·ft
   

Jeep CJ-7 (1979)

2-seater offroad vehicle, petrol (gasoline) 6-cylinder 12-valve straight (inline) engine, OHV (overhead valve, I-head), 4235 cm3 / 258.4 cu in / 258.4 cu in, 73.1 kW / 98.0 hp / 98.0 hp @ 3200 rpm / 3200 rpm / 3200 rpm, 261.0 N·m / 192.5 lb·ft / 192.5 lb·ft @ 1600 rpm / 1600 rpm / 1600 rpm, manual 3-speed transmission, four wheel drive

Infobox

The Varying Drivers License Requirements Around the World

Minimum driving ages, the number of passengers young drivers can have with them at any time, the times of day that drivers under the age of 18 can drive…

These all vary depending on where young motorists are driving. They vary, even, across the United States.

For instance, in Maine, motorists under the age of 18 aren’t allowed to have any passengers with them as they drive for the first 180 days after they obtain their licenses. In Alabama, motorists under the age of 18 can have one passenger with them.

And that’s just one example of the differences in driving license requirements from one part of the country to the next. The differences are even more pronounced when comparing one country to another. Minimum driving ages vary widely across the world. While most states in the United States allow youngsters to earn their learner’s permits at the age of 15, many other countries require their residents to be much older before they get behind the wheel of a car.

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