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Hupmobile - all models

Series: 6, 618, 621

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units: metric UK US

About Hupmobile

The Hupmobile was an automobile built from 1909 through 1940 by the Hupp Motor Company of Detroit, Michigan, which was located at 345 Belleview Avenue. Their first car, the Model 20, was introduced to the public at the Detroit Auto Show in February 1909. The company initially produced 500 vehicles.

Robert Craig Hupp, a former employee of Oldsmobile and Ford founded the company with his brother Louis in 1908. Production began in 1909. In 1910, production increased by more than 5000. Following disagreements with his financial backers Hupp sold his stock in the Hupp Motor Car Company and established the short-lived RCH Automobile Company, later the Hupp-Yates Electric Car Company.

Hupp Motor Company, however, continued to grow after its founder had left. A new plant was purchased in 1924 as Hupp competed strongly against Ford and Chevrolet and by 1928 sales had reached over 65,000 units. To increase production and handle the growth in sales, Hupp purchased the Chandler-Cleveland Motors Corporation (Chandler Motor Car) for its manufacturing facilities.

Sales and production began to fall even before the onset of the depression in 1930. A strategy to make the Hupmobile a larger, more expensive car began with the 1925 introduction of an 8-cylinder model, followed by the discontinuance of the traditional 4-cylinder Hupmobile. While aiming for a seemingly more lucrative market segment, Hupp essentially turned its back on its established clinetele. Nevertheless, in a constant effort to remain competitive, Hupp introduced a number of new features. They were one of the very first automakers to equip their cars with "free wheeling", a device that enjoyed immense, but brief, popularity in the early 1930s. Unfortunately, the company made the same mistake that many other medium-priced carmakers were making at the same time. Namely, in an attempt to capture every possible sale, they offered many different models. With Hupmobile's relatively low production volume, the result was that no model could be produced in sufficient quantity to keep manufacturing costs low enough to provide an operating profit. Hupp abandoned its more conservatively styled product line and turned to industrial designer Raymond Loewy to design its 1932 Hupp cyclefender, a flashy roadster which did well at the track, but sales continued to decline. 1934 saw the introduction of a striking restyle called the "Aerodynamic" by Loewy, as well as the lower-priced series 417-W using Murray-built slightly-modified Ford bodies.


S6 12v 3.2L SV    

Hupmobile 6-A (1926)

4-door 5-seater sedan (saloon), petrol (gasoline) 6-cylinder 12-valve straight (inline) engine, side valves (flathead, L-block, L-head), 3209 cm3 / 195.8 cu in / 195.8 cu in, rear wheel drive

S6 12v 4.0L SV    
75.3 kW / 101.0 hp / 101.0 hp        

Hupmobile 618

4-door 5-seater sedan (saloon), petrol (gasoline) 6-cylinder 12-valve straight (inline) engine, side valves (flathead, L-block, L-head), 4022 cm3 / 245.4 cu in / 245.4 cu in, 75.3 kW / 101.0 hp / 101.0 hp @ 3600 rpm / 3600 rpm / 3600 rpm, rear wheel drive

S8 16v 5.0L SV    
89.5 kW / 120.0 hp / 120.0 hp        

Hupmobile 621

4-door 5-seater sedan (saloon), petrol (gasoline) 8-cylinder 16-valve straight (inline) engine, side valves (flathead, L-block, L-head), 4972 cm3 / 303.4 cu in / 303.4 cu in, 89.5 kW / 120.0 hp / 120.0 hp @ 3500 rpm / 3500 rpm / 3500 rpm, rear wheel drive


Beyond basic auto insurance

In addition to having enough liability protection, there are some other coverages you should consider:

Collision: Pays for damage to your car resulting from a collision with another car, an object or as a result of flipping over. It also covers damage caused by potholes. Even if you are at fault for the accident, your collision coverage will reimburse you for the costs of repairing your car, minus the deductible. If you are not at fault, your insurance company may try to recover the amount they paid out from the other driver’s insurance company though a process called subrogation. If the company is successful, you will be reimbursed for the deductible.

Comprehensive: Reimburses you for loss due to theft or damage caused by something other than a collision with another car or object, such as fire, falling objects, missiles, explosion, earthquake, windstorm, hail, flood, vandalism, riot, or contact with animals such as birds or deer. Comprehensive insurance will also reimburse you if your windshield is cracked or shattered; some companies may waive the deductible on the glass portion of this coverage.

Uninsured and Underinsured Motorist Coverage: Reimburses you, a member of your family, or a designated driver if one of you is hit by an uninsured or hit-and-run driver. Underinsured motorist coverage comes into play when an at-fault driver has insufficient insurance to pay for your total loss. These coverages are required in 19 states, but available in all. It is important to purchase the same amount of coverage for uninsured/underinsured motorists as you have for liability to others.