Car quick pick

My car fleet

No cars selected
Durant logo

Durant - all models

Series: A-22, Star

Sort by: Year  Model  Displacement  Power  Weight 

units: metric UK US

About Durant

The Durant was a make of automobile assembled by Durant Motors Corporation of New York, New York from 1921 to 1926 and again from 1928 to 1932. Durant Motors was founded by William Crapo Durant (also known as Billy Durant) after he was terminated as the head of General Motors. Billy Durant's intent was to build an automotive empire that could one day challenge General Motors.

The Durant automobile is considered to be an example of an "assembled" automobile because so many of its components were obtained from outside suppliers. From 1921 to 1926 the vehicle was powered by a four cylinder Continental engine. The vehicle was directed at the Oakland automobile price point.

Production of the vehicle was suspended for the 1926 and 1927 model years. When the Durant was reintroduced, the car was redesigned and powered by a six cylinder Continental engine; some of the early vehicles were marketed as the "Durant-Star". Bodies for the vehicle were supplied by Budd Company. In 1930, some Durants were built with all steel bodies, also supplied by Budd.

Durant Motors was found insolvent and automobile production ended early in 1932.


S4 8v 3.3L         

Durant A-22 (1926)

4-door 5-seater touring car (tourer), petrol (gasoline) 4-cylinder 8-valve straight (inline) engine, 3285 cm3 / 200.5 cu in / 200.5 cu in, rear wheel drive

S4 8v 2.5L SV    
24.6 kW / 33.0 hp / 33.0 hp  125.0 N·m / 92.2 lb·ft / 92.2 lb·ft

Durant Star (1926)

petrol (gasoline) 4-cylinder 8-valve straight (inline) engine, side valves (flathead, L-block, L-head), 2492 cm3 / 152.1 cu in / 152.1 cu in, 24.6 kW / 33.0 hp / 33.0 hp @ 2500 rpm / 2500 rpm / 2500 rpm, 125.0 N·m / 92.2 lb·ft / 92.2 lb·ft @ 1200 rpm / 1200 rpm / 1200 rpm, rear wheel drive


Car Insurance FAQs #3

Why is the insurance company not returning all of my premium after the policy was canceled?

Depending on the type of policy, you may be required to pay a minimum premium, or the premium may be fully "earned." In other instances, if you replaced your coverage with a different company, during the policy term, you may be subject to a "short-rate" penalty, which is usually about 10% of the unearned amount. You might also have some premium due for recent changes in coverage. The company should be able to provide a detailed billing history that explains the return-premium calculation.

Am I required to complete a medical questionnaire?