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Series: TAV

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units: metric UK US

About Bucciali

The Bucciali was a French automobile manufactured from 1922 until 1933. Built by the brothers Bucciali, it began life at Courbevoie as a cyclecar under the name Buc. Initial offerings were powered by twin-cylinder two-stroke 1340cc engines. In 1925 a 1600cc SCAP-engined model appeared, available in two versions, the "Tourisme" and the "Quatre Speciale" supercharged. A six-cylinder car of 1500cc was also offered. 1928 saw the creation of a TAN six-cylinder and an eight-cylinder with front-wheel drive and Sensaud de Lavaud automatic gearbox, both of which caused a sensation. In the 1930s the company produced the Double Huit, also a front-wheel-drive model, which was powered by a pair of straight-eight Continental engines mounted side by side. The last of the prototypes took a Voisin 12-cylinder engine. Very few of the front-wheel-drive Buccialis ever reached the road.

While it is not known exactly how many of the TAV 12 models were produced, only two are known my automotive enthusiasts to still exist: one in America and one in France.

The TAV 12 pictured here has won its class at not only lesser-known concours events such as the Glenmoor Gathering of Significant Automobiles in Canton, Ohio in September 2006, but it has also taken honors at Pebble Beach.

Note: the black Bucciali that still exists was rebuilt by a man named Bruce Kelly

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4-door
5-seat
V12 24v 4.8L SL M-4
              
   

Bucciali TAV 12 (1932)

4-door 5-seater sedan (saloon), 12-cylinder 24-valve V engine, sleeve valves, 4800 cm3 / 292.9 cu in / 292.9 cu in, manual 4-speed transmission, front wheel drive

Infobox

Six Major Factors that Influence Auto Insurance Rates

No two car insurance rates are the same. From driver to driver, several factors will change how much a policyholder pays for even the same coverage. Here we review the six main components that go into the auto insurance rates recipe.

1. How Much You Drive

Car insurance companies measure rates based on risk. The more miles you drive, the higher the risk you will be in a car accident. You’ll pay more if you drive more. If, on the other hand, you drive fewer than 10,000 miles annually, you may qualify for a low mileage discount from your auto insurer. People who carpool often receive discounts because they drive less frequently.

2. Your Driving History

Being a good driver matters to car insurers. Many insurance companies offer special discounts to good drivers. If you have had a series of accidents or traffic violations, you may pay more for your premium. If you have not carried car insurance in several years, you may also pay more for your policy.

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