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Aero - all models

Series: Type 30, Type 50

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units: metric UK US

About Aero

The Aero was a Czech automobile, manufactured between 1929 and 1947 by a well-known aircraft and car-body company owned by one Dr. Kabes in Praha-Vysocany.

The original model, the Aero Type 500 cyclecar, had a 499 cc single-cylinder two-stroke engine with water cooling. Drive was to the rear axle through a 3 speed gearbox to a back axle without differential. Body styles were a roadster, cabriolet and coupé all with two seats in the front and one in the rear. About 1500 were made.

The next model in 1932, the Type 20, was a 660 cc vertical twin with, among other improvements, four wheel brakes. The most common body was a two door 3 seat roadster but 4 door saloons were also made using steel covered timber framed coachwork. A 999 cc 26 bhp engine was available from 1932.

In 1934 the Type 30 was announced with a 998 cc 26 bhp twin-cylinder engine, front wheel drive and all independent suspension. The car could reach 65 mph (105 km/h). About 3000 were made before the war.

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2-door
4-seat
S2   1.0L TS M-3
21.6 kW / 29.0 hp / 29.0 hp        
   

Aero Type 30 Roadster (1934)

2-door 4-seater roadster, petrol (gasoline) 2-cylinder 0-valve straight (inline) engine, two stroke, 998 cm3 / 60.9 cu in / 60.9 cu in, 21.6 kW / 29.0 hp / 29.0 hp @ 3200 rpm / 3200 rpm / 3200 rpm, manual 3-speed transmission, front wheel drive

2-door
5-seat
S4   2.0L TS M-3
33.6 kW / 45.1 hp / 45.1 hp        
   

Aero Type 50 Special Roadster (1938)

2-door 5-seater roadster, petrol (gasoline) 4-cylinder 0-valve straight (inline) engine, two stroke, 1997 cm3 / 121.9 cu in / 121.9 cu in, 33.6 kW / 45.1 hp / 45.1 hp, manual 3-speed transmission, front wheel drive

Infobox

Six Major Factors that Influence Auto Insurance Rates

No two car insurance rates are the same. From driver to driver, several factors will change how much a policyholder pays for even the same coverage. Here we review the six main components that go into the auto insurance rates recipe.

1. How Much You Drive

Car insurance companies measure rates based on risk. The more miles you drive, the higher the risk you will be in a car accident. You’ll pay more if you drive more. If, on the other hand, you drive fewer than 10,000 miles annually, you may qualify for a low mileage discount from your auto insurer. People who carpool often receive discounts because they drive less frequently.

2. Your Driving History

Being a good driver matters to car insurers. Many insurance companies offer special discounts to good drivers. If you have had a series of accidents or traffic violations, you may pay more for your premium. If you have not carried car insurance in several years, you may also pay more for your policy.

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